From where to advertise, to creating an engaging listing, getting your marketing right is essential for making your property stand out from the crowd.

Effective advertising generates greater interest in your property, attracting the right target tenants and providing you with a wider tenant pool to choose from.

Here, we share our advice on how to advertise rental property so you can speed up the rental process, find the right tenants and secure maximum returns on your investment.

 

Where To Advertise My Rental Property?

Let’s start with where to advertise. With the internet becoming the preferred source for property searches, it makes sense for your property to have a strong online presence.

Here are your options;

 

Online Property Portals

Online property portals such as Rightmove and Zoopla are very popular as they allow prospective tenants to narrow their search by location, size, price and much more.

Even high street lettings agents are turning to these sites to help get the properties on their books seen by a wider range of tenants.

Here’s a list of some popular property portals;

  • RightMove
  • Zoopla
  • Prime Location
  • On the Market

Most of these property portal sites don’t deal with private landlords directly. Instead you have two options;

  • Enlist the services of a high street lettings agent to post the listing for you
  • Use an online estate agent such as OpenRent or Upad

 

High Street Letting Agent

The benefit of advertising your property through a quality high street letting agent is that they will have the expertise and experience to market your property professionally and will take away the hassle of finding a tenant.

A letting agent will also conduct tenant referencing, property viewings and tenant checks which will save you a lot of time. However, this is often the more expensive option.

 

Online Letting Agent

When enlisting the services of an online letting agent, they will list your property for you on the relevant property websites and generate enquiries. You will still be able to meet potential tenants, conduct tenant referencing and choose the best fit yourself.

This is often cheaper than using a high street estate agent as there is just one fixed cost.

 

Social Media Platforms

Social media platforms such as Facebook are becoming a popular way of advertising and searching for rental properties, especially when it comes to finding rooms in shared houses.

The benefit of listing your property on social sites is that it is likely to reach wide audiences, as people can share with friends and comment directly on photos.

Lots of letting agents use social media to advertise the properties in their portfolio, or if you operate as a private landlord, you can create your own account. Join local online community groups to get your property seen by people looking for housing in the area and always reply to comments and enquiries.

 

How Do I Market My Rental Property Effectively?

Now we’ve looked at where to advertise, we now need to find out how. We’ve compiled a list of essential tips and advice to help rent your property to the right tenants, and fast;

 

Establish Your Target Tenant

The first step in the process is to establish your target tenant. Identifying a tenant profile will help tailor your marketing efforts to appeal to the right people.

For example, if you’re renting to students, make sure you advertise your property as furnished, or if you are targeting families, focus on space and the prevalence of schools in the area.

 

Calculate Your Rental Price

Next, you need to calculate a price bracket according to similar properties in the area and your target tenant’s income. Make sure you factor in maintenance costs, and any other outgoings.

Tip: When advertising on online property portals, take note of the price brackets of each site, and which price bracket your property will appear in. If you increase or decrease the rental price you could appear in a whole different price bracket and not be searchable to your target tenant.

 

Identify Your USPs

Your property’s USP or unique selling point is what makes it stand out from the competition, and what makes it attractive to your target tenant. It could be anything from a private garden or parking space to its proximity to local amenities such as schools and shops.

Whatever it is, make sure you highlight it in the description fields.

 

Include a Detailed Description

When it comes to writing a description for your property, you need to strike the right balance between engaging and informative.

Provide as much detail as you can about the property, including key features, the local area and USPs.

It’s best to start with a short, engaging paragraph describing the property as a whole, focusing on lifestyle aspects and the properties best bits. Then follow this up with a more detailed account of features, rooms and outside areas.

Always include the availability date and any other important details such as if bills are included.

Tip: If the property is furnished with quality furnishings and appliances, it may be worth incorporating some well-known brand names into the description. E.g, The modern kitchen features an LG fridge and Samsung washing machine.

 

Use Quality Photographs

Professional, good quality photographs are perhaps the most important factor when it comes to advertising your property. Be sure to include photos of each room, the exterior and any outdoor areas, paying particular attention to special features.

Try to take the photos on a sunny day to show your property in the best light and ensure everything is clean and tidy.

To maximise your properties potential, it’s worth investing in 360° property photography. 360° degree photography provides interactive, panoramic images that place the viewer in the footsteps of the photographer, bringing your property to life. These images can even be transformed into a virtual tour for remote property viewings!

The main thing to bear in mind is that first impressions count, and the images you provide will be make or break for many tenants.

 

Provide Details About Your Desired Tenant

As well as providing details for your tenants, it’s also a good idea to indicate what type of tenant you are looking for from the get-go. For example, state whether you allow pets or whether you are willing to rent to students. This will speed up the rental process by ensuring everyone is on the same page.

 

Respond Quickly

One you get an enquiry from a potential tenant, act fast. A swift reply will give a good impression and help secure a tenant as quickly as possible.

 

Ask For Help

Busy landlords have a lot to think about. That’s why it can pay to enlist professional services when advertising your property for rent.

We offer a range of property management services, all designed to help landlords, lettings agents and property professionals save time, streamline their processes and comply with regulations.

From 360° photography to help get your property noticed, to property viewings and comprehensive inventory reports, our teams across the UK are ready to help. Get in touch or browse our full list of property inventory services to find out more.

As a landlord, you’ll understand the importance of finding reliable tenants that pay the rent on time. One way to secure this is through comprehensive tenant reference checks. But what happens if a potential tenant fails their credit check?

Renting to tenants with bad credit doesn’t necessarily spell disaster. If the tenant ticks all the right boxes, there are ways to get around this issue and protect yourself and your investment.

 

What Is A Tenant Reference Check?

A tenant reference check helps landlords and letting agents decide if a tenant is likely to be reliable and pay each month’s rent on time.

In addition to a credit check, tenant referencing can look for;

  • Proof of identity
  • Proof of employment
  • Current salary
  • Bank statements
  • Proof of benefit claims
  • Right to rent in the UK
  • A previous landlord reference

 

What Is A Credit Check?

A credit check looks at the tenant’s credit report and financial history, spotting any times they have missed bill payments or have fallen into arrears. This is analysed to produce an individual credit score.

A credit score can range from around 0- 900 points, depending on the score system used. A good credit score could be anything above 750 points.

 

What’s The Minimum Credit Score A Landlord Should Accept For A Tenant?

An acceptable credit score will be dependent on the scoring system used, as they differ between referencing agencies. However, when a tenant’s credit score comes back as poor or very poor, you may want to think about asking some further questions.

 

What Causes A Bad Credit Scoring?

A poor credit score can be caused by a number of issues, some more concerning than others when it comes to potential tenants.

Here are a few of the more serious reasons for a poor credit rating;

 

Unpaid Debts

Naturally, being in debt can negatively affect a tenant’s credit score as it suggests that they struggle to manage their money and are not financially stable. If this issue is uncovered by a credit check, you may think twice about entering into a tenancy agreement.

 

Being Declared Bankrupt

This should set major alarm bells ringing for landlords as it suggests the tenant has had difficulty managing repayments in the past.

 

County Court Judgements

A County Court Judgment (CCJ) is when a tenant is forced to repay a debt by the courts. If this shows up, it’s not a great first impression.

 

Late Credit Card Or Loan Repayments

If a tenant has struggled to pay credit card repayments in time, this doesn’t bode well for rent payments.

 

There are also a number of issues that can affect credit scores that don’t necessarily mean a tenant will struggle with their finances;

 

Not Having A Credit History

One reason for a poor credit rating that is particularly common among younger tenants and students is not having a credit history at all. If the tenant has never taken out a credit card or loan and has never paid bills from their bank account, they won’t have a credit trail to check, resulting in a low score.

This is a likely occurrence if you rent to students or young adults who have just left home and doesn’t necessarily mean that the tenant will be bad at managing their money.

 

Only Making The Minimum Credit Card Repayments

Credit scores can be affected if the tenant only makes the minimum repayment on their credit card each month. The assumption is that they are struggling to keep up with all their outgoings, however this isn’t always the case.

 

Not Being On the Electoral Roll

Not updating addresses and personal information can affect credit score, as can not being on the electoral roll. This step is easily forgotten when moving house and doesn’t prove the tenant will be unreliable.

 

No Proof Of Address

If a tenant hasn’t been responsible for paying bills at their previous residence or were not named on the tenancy agreement, it can be difficult for the referencing agency to determine proof of address.

 

 

How Important Is Good Credit?

As we explored above, good credit isn’t the be all and end all when it comes to finding a good tenant. Equally as important is whether they fit your target tenant profile.

If you’ve been struggling to rent out your property or think the tenant will make a good fit, there are ways to get around bad credit.

 

 

How To Rent to Tenants With Bad Credit

Poor credit rating alone doesn’t mean you should give up on a tenant if they tick all the other boxes. Here are some ways to minimise risk;

 

Dig Deeper

The first thing to do when a potential tenant’s credit check comes back as poor, is to find out why. If it was down to late or missed payments it may be best to steer clear, however if it’s something as simple as a lack of credit history then it needn’t stop you from going ahead with the tenancy.

 

Ask To See Previous Rent Payments

Seeing proof of regular, timely rent payments for a previous rental arrangement will help to ease your concerns about their responsibility as a tenant.

 

Charge a Larger Deposit

If a tenant has a low credit score, it’s likely they will be prepared to pay a slightly larger security deposit to make up for it. This will give you extra leverage when it comes to recovering costs at the end of the tenancy.

 

Ask For A Guarantor

One of the best ways to protect yourself if a tenant has poor credit is to ask for a guarantor. A guarantor will be able to cover any costs if the tenant is unable to pay, giving you extra protection.

The guarantor will need to sign the tenancy agreement along with the tenant and have secure financial status.

 

Ask For A Previous Landlord Reference

One sure way to find out if a tenant is reliable is to ask their previous landlord.

Here are some questions to ask;

  • Did the tenant pay rent on time each month?
  • Did the tenant look after the rental property?
  • How often did the tenant raise issues with the landlord or letting agent?
  • Were any complaints received from neighbours regarding the tenant?
  • What condition did they leave the property at the end of the tenancy?
  • Would you feel happy renting to the tenant again?

 

Ask For Rent Upfront

While this may be a lot to ask and not always in scope, a tenant with a high risk credit score may be prepared to pay rent upfront. Paying the first six months of rent upfront will ease any initial worries and give the tenant time to prove their reliability.

 

Receive Payments By Direct Debit

Asking for rent payments via direct debit is common practice these days and is especially important if you’re concerned about a tenant’s financial responsibility.

 

Shorten The Tenancy

If you’re worried about the reliability of a tenant, setting a shorter, probationary rental period in which the tenant has time to prove their responsibility could be a good idea. If you experience late payments or other issues, you can terminate the tenancy early.

 

Talk To The Tenant

You can tell a lot from a frank, face-to-face conversation. If your potential tenant willingly discloses their credit issues and can provide a reasonable explanation for the low score, you will be much better placed to make an informed decision.

 

How To Organise A Tenant Reference Check

Although credit checks aren’t the only way to choose the right tenant, it is important to perform tenant referencing so you aren’t caught out further down the line.

As a busy landlord, you may want to delegate this task to a professional tenant referencing company. Placing this responsibility in the experienced hands of a recommended referencing company will minimise any risks and help the process go smoothly.

 

 

Protect Your Property With No Letting Go

In addition to choosing a reliable tenant, a comprehensive inventory is one of the best ways to protect your rental property.

At No Letting Go, we offer unbiased property inventory reports to help safeguard your property against damage and recover essential costs at the end of a tenancy. All the way through from Schedule of Condition, to check in and property visits, our property clerks are there to simplify the rental process and save you time.

Interested in hearing more? Head to our website to discover the full range of property management services we offer.

Budgets can be tough to manage for landlord and letting agents alike. Sometimes, property maintenance costs can eat into your finances dramatically.

From what’s involved to how to save, we offer insights and guidance on how to best manage budgets when undergoing maintenance on your property portfolio.

 

What Is Included In Maintenance Costs?

Before we go into budget management, we need to be clear on what maintenance costs are involved in renting a residential property.

Here’s a list of all the things to consider when it comes to maintenance;

 

Repair Costs

As a landlord, it’s your responsibility to fix any repairs needed resulting from normal wear and tear. This can include;

  • Repairing or replacing white goods and appliances
  • Fixing boiler issues
  • Repairing any electrical faults

 

Refurbishment & Decoration

Keeping your property looking fresh for new tenants is an important part of being a good landlord and attracting the right target tenants. It’s recommended that carpets are replaced every 5-7 years, and properties are fully redecorated every 3 years.

However, if your property is looking particularly lived in after a tenancy or you come across some questionable stains, you might need to redecorate more often.

Here’s what else is included in refurbishment and decoration;

  • Painting throughout
  • Replacing carpets or flooring
  • Replacing curtains
  • Replacing old, tired furniture items every 10-15 years
  • Replacing kitchen and bathroom fittings every 10-15 years

 

Exterior Maintenance

It’s not just the inside that needs attention. Staying on top of the exterior of your property can help ward off future structural issues and save money in the long run.

Here’s what it could include;

  • Replacing missing roof tiles
  • Clearing guttering
  • Garden fence maintenance
  • Window cleaning and repair

 

Interior Cleaning

Thorough cleaning is essential between tenancies, and you may also need to arrange for cleaning to be done during a tenancy. If the windows need cleaning for example, or if the property has suffered water damage.

 

Property Inspections

Particularly important during void periods, regular property inspections are an important part of maintenance for buy to let properties.

Inspections protect your property from theft, vandalism or damage from unnoticed leaks, preventing the need for extensive future repairs. We offer a professional vacant property inspection service to give you peace of mind that your investment is protected.

 

Gas Safety Certificates & Safety Checks

UK landlords have a legal requirement to arrange regular safety checks, including;

  • An annual gas safety inspection from a Gas Safe registered engineer
  • Electrical safety checks
  • PAT tests for white goods
  • Energy Performance Certificate
  • Ensure smoke detectors are present and working

 

Your Time

This cost is usually overlooked by most landlords, but the time you put into the maintenance of your portfolio really adds up. Particularly if you are balancing your duties as a landlord with another paid job, extra time spent on maintenance may mean losing out on wages.

If this is the case, it may be worth investing in a full management service from a property management company so you can swap a management fee for more time for other ventures.

 

How Much Does It Cost To Maintain A Rental Property?

 

Maintenance costs will vary depending on several factors;

  • Size of the property
  • Age of the property- older homes require more upkeep
  • Location of the property- service charges vary dependant on area
  • Type and number of tenants

For example, if you rent to students or large families, you may have to fork out more for accidental damage repair costs.

 

Landlord Maintenance Costs: How to Save Money

Now we’ve discussed what’s involved, it’s time to look at ways to save.

 

Choose Your Target Tenant Wisely

While finding tenants may not be the first thing you think of when it comes to maintenance, the tenant you choose could have an effect on your maintenance costs.

For example, as mentioned above, renting to students can result in more accidental damage as there tends to be more people living in one property, and tenants have a reputation for partying! Similarly, renting to tenants with pets is likely to involve more refurbishment at the end of the tenancy.

Deciding on your target tenant from the get-go is an important part of the process.

 

Act Fast When It Comes to Repairs

The quicker you act on repairs and maintenance tasks, the more popular you’ll be with tenants and the less likely they are to develop into serious issues. Usually, dealing with problems as soon as they arise means you can save money in the long run as you have time to think about the best possible solution.

Paying for maintenance costs early will also help you to manage your monthly budgets and keep on top of your spend.

 

Buy Quality Furnishings

Opting for the cheapest furnishings available isn’t always wise. The cost of replacing flimsy furniture every year is likely to add up to more than investing in quality in the first place. This is particularly true for mattresses, sofas and dining tables. Our blog on furnishing your rental property will help you with some handy tips.

 

Keep It Simple

When it comes to decorating your properties, more is less. You don’t need to go overboard to provide a comfortable home for tenants. Simple, modern furniture without too many frills will appeal to most and will be kinder on the budget.

Tip: Avoid painting everything white as it will require more upkeep. Neutral, mid-tones are much more forgiving.

 

Don’t Skimp on Landlord Insurance

Landlord insurance is essential when renting a property. Finding the right deal can help you save when things go wrong. Quality contents or accidental damage insurance will protect you in the case of weather damage or accidental spills.

Make sure you shop around for the best deals.

 

Check Council Tax Exceptions

If one of your rental properties is vacant for a period, or you are performing refurbishment that renders your property inhabitable, you may be eligible for Council Tax redemption. This will leave you with some extra cash to spend on essential repairs and decoration.

 

Landlord’s Energy Saving Allowance

By increasing the energy-saving potential of your property, you could save money that can be injected back into the maintenance budget.

By reinforcing insulation in your rental property, you could save a significant amount in tax.

 

Know When To Ask For Help

While rolling up your sleeves and getting stuck in can save on service fees, it’s not always the best option.

Botched DIY can end up costing more than the original problem, and when it comes to electrical or plumbing issues, professional is always best.

 

Get More Than One Quote

When you need to pick up the phone to a plumber or tradesperson, make sure you do your research.

Particularly important when it comes to bigger jobs, getting several quotes will help you find the most competitive price.

 

Invest In A Comprehensive Inventory Service

Compiling a comprehensive written and photographic list of all of the items and furnishings and their condition within your property is one of the best ways to recuperate maintenance costs at the end of a tenancy.

If there is any damage beyond normal wear and tear, it will be much easier to deduct the appropriate costs from the deposit.

A professional property inventory service provides an impartial account of your property and is delivered using high quality photography in a handy, easily accessible digital report.

 

Landlord Maintenance Responsibilities: Help From No Letting Go

The costs of being a landlord are wide ranging. From agent fees to mortgage interest, balancing your rental income with outgoing costs can be tough.

That’s why sometimes it pays to get some help. Whether it’s repairs and maintenance reports or inventory services, our teams of experienced clerks could help streamline your business so you can take control of your budget.

Browse our full list of property management services to find out how we can help.

It can be tricky to make your property stand out from the crowd in the saturated property sector. So, how can you take advantage of the latest in digital photography software to ensure your property is snapped up by the best tenants?

That’s where 360° property photography comes in. Our virtual photography service could be the difference between blending in and beating the competition.

If you’re looking to attract more viewings and get ahead of the curve with the latest in PropTech, find out what this service could offer.

 

What is 360° Degree Photography?

360° degree photography provides interactive, panoramic images that place the viewer in the footsteps of the photographer. This type of panoramic photography allows you to ‘look’ up, down and to the left and right of the image for a full 360° view.

Panoramic photos are transformed via 360 degree photography software to recreate a room or space. (You may have seen this being used in google street view on google maps)

 

What is a 360° Virtual Tour?

A 360° virtual tour replicates a standard property tour or house viewing through virtual reality, allowing the user to ‘visit’ properties from anywhere in the world. Users are able to explore each room of the property from the comfort of their living rooms via a connected device.

 

The Benefits of Virtual 360° Photography Tours

With most property searches starting online, it makes sense to present your property in its best light. From saving time to gaining trust, here’s what 360° technology could do for your business;

 

Exceptional Property Marketing

First impressions count and 360° photos could give your property the edge. High quality images make you and your business look professional, and the more detailed images available of your property, the more popular it will be with prospective tenants.

Bring your property to life and highlight its best features with a full, virtual tour and help potential tenants picture themselves living in your property by exploring each room in detail.

 

Gain Tenant Trust

There isn’t really anywhere to hide when it comes to virtual photography tours. By providing a realistic picture of your property and putting every part of the building on display, you will gain trust from tenants. Essential for starting the tenant relationship off on the right foot.

 

Remote Property Viewings

A virtual tour can be accessed from anywhere- all you need is a digital device.

Save time and resources by allowing prospective tenants to experience an immersive online property viewing from home. This benefits tenants and property professionals alike, as tenants won’t waste time visiting unsuitable properties and lettings agents will have a narrower, targeted tenant pool to focus on.

This service could also benefit landlords who live abroad or a long distance away from the properties in their portfolio, allowing them to inspect their investment from anywhere in the world.

 

Quick Turnaround

With a 24 hour turn around, our 360° virtual photography service can be delivered quickly, so you can stay ahead in the dynamic lettings industry.

 

Our Property Reporting Software

Our property reporting software, Kaptur, enables virtual tours to be embedded into any compliance report.

Kaptur has been developed specifically for busy property professionals looking to streamline their workload. From custom reporting to location mapping- Kaptur represents the latest in PropTech.

 

How Can 360° Virtual Tour Photography Be Used?

We’ve partnered with Eye Spy 360 to offer a nationwide service helping landlords, estate agents and property professionals market and manage their property portfolios.

Here’s an example of when virtual tours could be utilised;

  • Residential sales and lettings marketing
  • Insurance inspections
  • Block and property management inspections
  • Derelict building inspections
  • Property research projects
  • Inventory and schedule of condition of large properties
  • Commercial sales and leasing
  • Build to Rent projects

Whatever the type of property, a 360° virtual tour could be of service.

 

Property Photography and Floor Plans

In addition to standard property photography as part of your visual inventory report, we also offer floor plan services to add to your marketing literature and reporting.

All of the No Letting Go surveyors are highly trained according to the Royal Institute of Chartered Surveyors (RICS) guidelines, ensuring a professional service with accurate results.

 

360° Property Photography Prices

Interested in finding out more? Get in touch to book a survey or find out how we can incorporate a 360° virtual property tour into a regular No Letting Go report.

To discover how else we could help, browse our full list of property management services.

It’s a common question among new or soon-to-be landlords – do I need landlord insurance?

The short answer is yes. In addition to healthy investment returns, being a landlord comes with a lot of added risks and responsibility. To minimise this risk, investing in reliable insurance is essential.

Protecting your investment is paramount, but the jargon around landlord insurance can make it tricky to keep your facts straight.

We’ve curated a simple, yet comprehensive guide for landlords to help you get your head around landlord insurance and work out which type is best for you.

Here’s what it is, how it works and how to get it.

 

What is Landlord Insurance Cover?

Landlord insurance is a type of home insurance, specifically designed for rental properties. This broad term can include anything from contents insurance to rental protection.

Your policy could cover;

  • Damage to the property
  • Loss of rent
  • Damage to or loss of contents
  • Legal claims made against you by tenants

 

Is Landlord Insurance a Legal Requirement?

While landlord insurance isn’t a legal requirement, standard home insurance will not cover you for rental properties and going without could cost you dearly in terms of money, time and hassle.

 

Do You Really Need Landlord Insurance?

Often, you will need permission from your mortgage provider in order to let your property to tenants who will most likely require specialist insurance.

Legal issues aside, it’s always a good idea to protect your property as comprehensively as possible to protect both yourself and your investment.

 

What’s the Difference Between Home Insurance and Landlord Insurance?

Home insurance is designed to protect private homes from damage and loss. A rental property comes with a whole host of different issues. For example, as a landlord, you are less able to keep an eye on the day to day happenings in the property and have to rely on tenants to update you on any problems that occur.

Here’s a few of the differences between home and landlord insurance;

  • Home insurance only covers the owner/occupier if they are in need of alternative accommodation. Landlord insurance covers tenants in this situation.
  • Landlord insurance can cover you for loss of rent.
  • Landlord insurance can cover any legal costs needed as a result of your actions as a landlord.

 

Types of Landlord Insurance

Here, we provide a brief overview of the different types of landlord insurance available;

 

Landlord Buildings Insurance

Buildings insurance covers any damage caused to the building itself. This could mean damage from fire, flooding or even malicious damage caused by the occupants. Every insurance provider is different, so you’ll have to check which type of damage this covers.

We highly recommend getting buildings insurance, especially if you are the freeholder.

 

Landlord Contents Insurance

Contents insurance protects against loss or damage of goods and furniture within a property. So, if you are renting a furnished property, it could be a good idea. However, this type of insurance does not protect against normal wear and tear.

Different insurance plans offer various cover and allow you to insure different parts of your property. For example, communal areas in flats or shared accommodation. It won’t protect items belonging to tenants.

 

Accidental Damage Insurance

Accidental damage insurance comes under contents insurance and can cover the cost of anything from spills and stains to broken windows.

 

Landlord Rent Guarantee Insurance

Otherwise known as rental protection insurance or loss of rent insurance, this type of cover protects you if you are unable to rent out your property as a result of an insured event like a fire or flood.

 

Tenant Default Insurance

Tenant default insurance covers you if your tenant fails to pay rent for two months, covering the cost for up to eight months. You will need to conduct the proper credit checks at the start of the tenancy to be eligible.

 

Commercial Landlord Insurance

If you let to a third-party business, you will need commercial landlord insurance. Commercial buildings have different designs and purposes, meaning there are different risks attached.

Commercial landlord insurance can cover accidental damage, vandalism and rental income protection.

 

Landlord Liability Insurance

Also referred to as property owner’s liability cover, this type of insurance covers legal defence costs and expenses in the event your tenant has an accident and considers it your fault.

With this type of insurance, you’re looking at high limits, usually upwards of £1 million.

 

Legal Expenses Insurance

This covers legal expenses such as court costs when chasing up late tenant payments and gives you access to legal expertise.

 

Employers’ Liability Insurance

If you employ anyone else to work at one of your rental properties, say as a gardener or cleaner, you are required by law to have this insurance. Employers’ liability covers legal defence costs and awards made for any injuries, accidents or illness as a result of your negligence.

 

HMO Landlord Insurance

If you rent out an HMO property, the terms of your insurance cover will differ slightly from single occupancy homes.

Finding an insurance plan tailored to HMO properties could help you get the protection you need.

 

Alternative Accommodation Insurance

If your property becomes uninhabitable due to an insured event and the tenancy agreement requires you to provide alternative accommodation for your tenants, this type of insurance is a good idea.

 

Unoccupied Property Insurance

Unoccupied property cover can help during void periods or if you need to make renovations to your property. To qualify as unoccupied, a property usually has to be vacant for 30 days.

You will also need to arrange for regular vacant property inspections.

 

Multi-House Landlord Insurance

If you have several properties in your portfolio, it is probably worth taking out multi-property landlord insurance.

By including all of your properties on one policy, you could save money and time on paperwork and other processes.

 

Landlord Home Emergency Insurance

Boiler breakdown or serious leaks are a surprisingly common occurrence. Landlord home emergency insurance provides you with 24/7 access to emergency cover for plumbing, heating, power and security issues.

 

What Kind of Insurance do I Need for a Rental Property?

The type of insurance you’ll need depends on the type of property you rent and your specific needs as a landlord. We answer some common questions;

 

Do I Need Landlord Insurance If I Have Buildings Insurance?

In most cases, you will need to take out a specific insurance when renting out a property in addition to your home buildings insurance.

Some policies may allow you to amend your existing home buildings insurance to cover your activities as a landlord, however you may also want to take out extra insurance to cover all bases.

 

Do I Need Landlord Insurance if Renting to Family?

Yes. It is just as important to have insurance when renting to family members. You will need to draw up a tenancy agreement for legal purposes, even if it’s just a casual arrangement.

Renting to offspring or siblings may feel informal, but if they are paying you rent, you are legally regarded as their landlord and standard home insurance won’t cover you.

 

Do I Need Landlord Insurance If I Live in the Property?

Even if you live in the property, standard home insurance won’t protect you. Make sure you tell your lender that you live in the rental property when you take out the insurance. Again, you will need a tenancy agreement in place.

 

Do I Need Landlord Insurance for a Flat?

Renting out a flat is the same as renting a house when it comes to insurance.

The only difference with renting a flat is that you may not need buildings insurance if there is a freeholder arranging this. Be sure to inform them that you are renting out your flat so they can make any adjustments to their insurance policy.

 

Do I Need Landlord Insurance if Renting a Room?

Again, standard home insurance is unlikely to be valid when renting out a room in the same property you live in.

If you have a lodger, you will need a tenancy agreement in place for your landlord insurance policy.

 

What Does Landlord Insurance Cover?

Landlord insurance can cover a variety of different risks and situations, depending on your needs. The basics are buildings and contents cover, but you can add extra policies as you see fit.

We answer some common questions about landlord insurance cover;

 

Does Landlord Insurance Cover Accidental Damage?

Yes. If you want your insurance policy to cover accidental damage such as dodgy DIY or carpet stains, opt for accidental damage insurance to protect your property.

 

Does Landlord Insurance Cover Appliances?

Yes. Contents insurance covers white goods and appliances provided by you in the rental property.

 

Does Landlord Insurance Cover Tenant Injury?

Yes. To protect yourself against legal claims made by tenants, landlord liability insurance will provide legal defence costs and expenses.

 

Does Landlord Insurance Cover Unpaid Rent?

Yes. Tenant default insurance covers you if your tenant fails to pay rent for two consecutive months.

 

How Does Landlord Insurance Work?

Your first step in purchasing landlord insurance is to decide what type of cover you need. It’s possible to find a tailored policy suited to your individual needs and requirements. Whether you opt for basic cover (building, contents and liability) or go for comprehensive cover, make sure you read the fine print to find out exactly what’s included.

 

What is Sum Insured?

The sum insured is the amount an insurer will pay out for a claim. The higher the value of your rental property, the larger this amount will be. Make sure the sum insured is enough to rebuild your property, rather than focusing on its market value.

Calculating your rebuild cost accurately will ensure you don’t overpay for your insurance. There are online rebuilding cost calculators to help, although keep in mind, this will only provide you with an estimate rather than exact values.

 

Levels of Excess

You will also need to think about the amount of excess you are able to pay if you need to make a claim. Higher excess reduces the cost of your insurance and different claims can come with different levels of excess.

 

Be Prepared

Before you buy you will need to know;

  • Your rental property’s rebuild value
  • The level of excess you can pay
  • What type of cover you need

 

How to Claim Landlord Insurance

If you ever need to make a claim, make sure you do so as soon as possible. You will need to provide as much evidence as you can to get the best pay-out. This could include receipts, invoices and photographic evidence.

 

How Much Does Landlord Insurance Cost?

The cost of your landlord insurance will be dependent on a variety of different factors;

  • Location – Local crime rates and the probability of severe weather in a certain area will affect the cost of your insurance.
  • Type of tenants – Students, tenants with pets and those on housing benefits are deemed more of a risk by some insurers, meaning higher insurance costs.
  • Size of property – More tenants means higher costs.
  • Number of properties – Naturally, more properties mean more costs. Look for an insurer who offers portfolio property discounts.
  • Sums insured – Your insurance will cost more the larger your sums insured

 

Which is the Best Landlord Insurance?

To compare landlord insurance and get a landlord insurance quote, there are plenty of price comparison sites to reference.

Here are some popular landlord insurance providers;

  • AXA Landlord Insurance
  • Aviva Landlord Insurance
  • CIA Landlord Insurance
  • SAGA Landlord Insurance
  • Direct Line Landlord Insurance
  • Hamilton Fraser Total Landlord Insurance

Makes sure you shop around and do your research to get the best deal for you.

 

Protect Your Investment with No Letting Go

We understand the importance of protecting your rental property for the long-term success of your business.

A detailed property inventory is one of the best ways to secure your property by providing the critical evidence you need to recuperate costs. Find out more about our professional, unbiased property inventory service to get started.

If you’re weighing up the pros and cons of providing a furnished or partly furnished property for prospective tenants, you’ve come to the right place.

Letting a furnished property has plenty of benefits, including quality tenants and longer tenancies. However, furnishing your property can get expensive and cause issues down the line if not done properly.

Here, we discuss how to furnish a rental property with tips and tricks on making the most of your portfolio.

 

What’s the Difference Between Fully Furnished and Partly Furnished?

Let’s clear this up before we get started.

 

Furnished

Usually, a furnished property will come with essential electrical appliances, white goods and basic furniture. In short, everything a tenant needs to move in straight away.

 

Partly Furnished

A partly furnished property will only include white goods, lighting and essentials such as curtains and kitchen cabinets. It may also include some other furniture items at the discretion of the landlord or letting agent.

 

Unfurnished

An unfurnished property will come with only the very basics- light fittings, carpets and essential appliances such as an oven.

 

Should you Furnish Your Rental Property?

Furnished or unfurnished? It’s a tricky question. While renting unfurnished properties may seem like the easy option, providing a furnished property comes with attractive benefits;

 

You Can Charge Higher Rent

A well-furnished property may affect the amount of rent you can charge.

With a lack of quality, furnished properties on the rental market, tenants searching for a ready-made home are prepared to pay a little more for the convenience.

Good quality furnishings that make your property look welcoming will attract tenants and help your property stand out.

 

Attract the Right Tenants

A well-furnished property will attract a wider pool of renters, allowing you to pick and choose to find the right tenant for you– whatever that might look like.

 

Secure Longer Tenancies

A home that feels well cared for and inviting will encourage tenants to stay longer term.

 

Who is Your Target Tenant?

The tenant group you’re targeting should be the biggest consideration when deciding whether to furnish your property. Well established families or older professionals are likely to have their own furniture they want to bring with them.

Whereas students or young professionals may be looking for convenience and a place they can move in straight away.

 

What Does a Landlord Have to Provide in a Furnished Flat?

When providing tenants with a furnished home, there are certain items they will expect to be included;

 

What to Include

A furnished property should include;

  • White goods (oven, washing machine, fridge freezer etc.)
  • Dining table and chairs
  • Beds
  • Sofas and chairs
  • Wardrobes, chest of drawers and cupboards
  • Light fittings
  • Curtains
  • Carpets

 

What Not to Include

However, there are a few items landlords are not expected to provide;

  • Bed linen, duvets and pillows
  • Cleaning supplies

 

Furnishing a Buy to Let Property: Top Tips

To make things easier for yourself at the end of the tenancy agreement, we have some tips and advice on how to furnish your rental property;

 

Choose Easy to Clean Furniture

Wear and tear is inevitable, but to keep your property in good condition, easy to clean appliances will encourage your tenants to keep things well maintained.

 

Avoid Decorations

When it comes to personal taste, we’re all different. Let your tenants choose the little details so they can feel at home. Similarly- neutral colours work best.

 

Choose Easy to Replace Items

This way, if things get broken, they can be replaced with a ‘like for like’ item without too much bother.

 

Replace Furnishings as Needed

Old, stained carpets will do nothing for your properties appeal. The Tenancy Deposit Scheme recommends replacing most items of furniture after 7 years.

 

Provide Basic Tools

Providing basic tools will encourage tenants to take care of minor issues themselves, taking one more thing off your plate.

 

Follow Safety Regulations

As a responsible landlord, you need to follow fire safety laws when it comes to soft furnishings.

 

Choosing the Right Furnishings

Let’s take a closer look at some of the types of furniture to include in your rental property, room by room.

Image of blue sofa in front of white brick wall

Living Room Furniture

Basics to include:

  • Sofa(s) or armchairs
  • Coffee table
  • Bookcase
  • Carpet
  • Lights

 

Best Sofas for Rental Properties

Here’s a few of our top picks of the best sofas to buy for your rental property:

The Budget 2-Seater

This modern 2-seater sofa in a neutral grey will work well in slick apartments for young professionals and is pretty easy on the budget too!

The Classic Sofa Bed

A sofa bed is a big plus among tenants, and this one is great value for money. This simple, classic style will work well in most interiors and families will love the extra storage space.

The Quality 3-Seater

If you’re trying to attract professionals willing to pay high prices for the right home, a quality sofa is essential. This one comes from an esteemed brand and the elegant style will have mass appeal.

 

Kitchen/Dining Room Furniture

Basics to include:

  • Kitchen cabinets
  • Essential appliances (oven, washing machine, fridge freezer, toaster, kettle etc.)
  • Table and chairs

 

Best Dining Tables for Rental Properties

A dining table is the hub of any home and getting the right one is important.

The Space Saving Solution

This handy piece of furniture features built in storage and a fold-out table design. Perfect when letting properties with small kitchens.

The Extendable Table

The simple, modern design of this table will fit neatly into any interior, and the extendable section can accommodate extra guests. It’s also budget-friendly!

 

Bedroom Furniture

Basics to include:

  • Bed
  • Mattress
  • Wardrobe
  • Chest of drawers
  • Bedside table
  • Carpet
  • Lighting

 

Best Mattress for Rental Properties

A mattress is perhaps the most important piece of furniture for your rental property. A considerate investment, you need it to be durable and long lasting. Here’s our top picks;

The Affordable Memory Foam Mattress

This mattress from the Memory Foam Warehouse makes quality memory foam affordable. Starting at under £100, you’re unlikely to find anything cheaper.

The Bed-in-a-Box Mattress

Buying a mattress for your rental property is only half the battle. The next job is delivery. Opting for a bed in a box mattress means the mattress can be delivered straight to the property in a convenient sized box.

The Mattress Topper

Once you’ve invested in a mattress, it makes sense to protect it. A mattress topper can prolong the life of a mattress and guard against stains to keep it looking fresh at the end of the tenancy. This memory foam mattress topper is a cheap but comfortable option.

 

Protecting Your Furnished Rental Property: Inventory Management

Once you’ve gone to the effort of furnishing your rental property, you need to ensure it’s protected.

The easiest way to do this is by investing in a comprehensive inventory report delivered by unbiased professionals. A property inventory helps guard your property and its contents against damage by providing full details of its condition at the start and end of a tenancy.

At No Letting Go, we provide landlords and property professionals with comprehensive services and reports to protect their investment and streamline processes. Browse our full list of inventory management services to find out how we can help.

The Equalities and Human Rights Commission have recently revealed that 93% out of 8.5 million rental homes in the UK are not fit for disabled access, leaving at least 365,000 disabled people in unsuitable accommodation.

There is a pressing need for more accessible rental properties across the UK and the government is cracking down on landlords who do not make the necessary changes. However, this does mean that there is a large number of disabled tenants looking for appropriate housing.

From entry ramps to chair lifts, there are many ways to adapt a property for disabled access. Adapting a home and renting to disabled tenants could even open your property up to a wider range of potential renters.

Here, we look at ways to adapt your rental property so you can welcome a new target tenant group to your portfolio.

 

UK Rights for Disabled Tenants

Before you start thinking about adapting your property, it’s important to be aware of disabled people’s rights in the UK.

The Equality Act 2010 set out ways to protect people in society, including the rental sector.

According to the Act, a person has a disability if;

  • The person has a physical or mental impairment, and
  • This impairment has a substantial, long-term effect on their ability to carry out day-to-day activities.

Now, let’s look at your responsibilities as a property professional.

 

Laws for Private Landlords and Letting Agents

It is against the law for a landlord to discriminate against a disabled tenant. For example, as a landlord, letting or estate agent it is illegal to;

  • Refuse to rent to a disabled person because of their disability
  • Refuse to allow a guide dog or assistance dog under the no pets rule
  • Charge higher rent or deposit to disabled tenants
  • Refuse access to additional facilities that are available to other tenants (e.g. laundry room or parking space)
  • Evict a tenant due to disability or illness
  • Give tenants a less secure tenancy agreement

If a tenant feels they are being discriminated against, they could talk to Citizens advice or the EHRC and you could experience serious repercussions.

 

Landlord Responsibilities when Renting to Disabled Tenants

When renting to a disabled tenant, you are responsible for providing necessary, reasonable adaptations to make your property accessible and suitable to their individual needs. This can include additional services or equipment known as ‘auxiliary aids’.

Auxiliary aids can include;

  • Wheelchair ramps
  • Written documents and signs in Braille
  • Accessible door handles
  • Accessible taps
  • Special furnishings (e.g. raised toilet seat)

Refusing these changes could mean you’re breaking the law.

 

How to Adapt Your Property for Disabled Tenants

When renting to a disabled tenant, it’s likely you will need to make some changes to your property in order to make it accessible. These changes very much depend on the individual needs and requirements of the tenant.

Here are some of the ways you may be required to alter your rental property;

 

Installing Access Ramps

If your tenant uses a wheelchair or mobility scooter and your property has steps up to the entrance or between rooms, you may need to install access ramps at entrances.

 

Installing Chair Lifts and Railings

For multi-story homes, chair lifts and railings may be required for less able tenants. Railings may also be needed in bathrooms.

 

Fitting Accessible Kitchen and Bathroom Facilities

Wheelchair users may need lower kitchen and bathroom facilities which are accessible at chair height. Bathrooms may require a wet room and accessible toilets.

 

Widening Doors

Doors and entrance ways may need to be widened to allow for safe wheelchair access. (Usually 750mm)

 

Raised Plugs and Features

Features such as plugs and light fixtures will need to be accessible to your tenant(s).

 

Ground Floor Level Access

Some disabled tenants will require ground floor level access. You will need to provide a bathroom, bedroom and kitchen at ground level.

 

Unrestricted Parking

Your tenant may need access to a parking space which is easily accessible from the property.

 

Written Signs and Documents in Braille

Visually impaired tenants may require all tenancy documents and signs throughout the home to be provided in Braille. This includes features such as fire safety notices. Tenants with learning disabilities may ask for documents provided in alternative formats.

 

Covering the Costs of Adapting a Property

You may be thinking about the cost of these changes and how you’re going to cover them.

It’s true that some of these adaptations involve significant work, costing around £20,000 to adapt a standard property.

However, there are ways to help cover the costs;

 

Disabled Facilities Grants (DFG)

Landlords and tenant alike can apply for a disabled facilities grant which provides funds for adaptations. This grant is supplied by the local council and is subject to an eligibility test where an occupational therapist will assess the property and the adaptations needed before making a decision.

The amount you receive depends on the changes needed, but sums of up to £25,000 can be granted.

To apply, contact your local council.

Remember, if you fail to make the necessary changes, it could cost you a whole lot more in legal costs if the case goes to court!

 

A Helping Hand from No Letting Go

While this information may appear daunting at first, No Letting Go are on hand to help;

  • For example, our 360 Virtual Tour and Photography service allows potential tenants to view your property from any location- solving accessibility issues for many disabled tenants.
  • Providing a safe, comfortable and accessible home is particularly important when renting to disabled tenants. All of our property services are designed to streamline your workload and ensure your property is fully compliant with current health, safety and legal regulations.
  • Once you’ve made these adaptations to your rental property, it’s important to protect your investment. Our professional inventory service helps to safeguard your property by providing evidence of the condition of your property at the start and end of the tenancy.

Discover the rest of our property management services to find out how we could help.

For landlords and property professionals, finding the right tenant for your rental property is fundamental for business success.

But who should be your target tenant?

It’s not as simple as finding someone who can pay the rent on time. Wide-ranging factors such as profession, marital status and long-term goals should also come into play when thinking about what you want from the arrangement and the safeguarding of your property.

Here, we look at the pros and cons of renting to different types of tenants so you can identify the right target tenant for you.

Choosing the Right Tenant

Before you start marketing your rental property, you first need to identify a target audience to gear your tenant search towards.

By identifying a specific tenant persona from the get-go, you will be in a better position to rent your property and attract your ideal tenant. Whether your first priority is the careful upkeep of your property, or to find a long-term tenant, establishing your needs and requirements at this stage will help narrow down the search.

When it comes to finding a good tenant, think about your future relationship and who you want to be dealing with on a regular basis. A good tenant looks different to different landlords. Do you want someone looking for a long-term let, or a you happy with a quick turn-around?

Whatever your needs, here are some of the pros and cons of different types of tenants;

 

High Income Tenants

The income of your target tenant depends largely on the type and size of the rental property you own and its location.

For example, landlords with property in central London will need to target high income tenants in order to meet monthly rent payments.

One of the biggest benefits of renting to high income tenants is that you can rely on sufficient rent return and are unlikely to have to chase up missed payments. However, a tenant with a higher income is likely to hold your property up to higher standards.

Any good landlord will be committed to ensuring their properties are pleasant, safe spaces to live in, but renting to this group requires a higher level of detail.
This means replacing carpets and furnishings more regularly and providing sought after benefits such as high-speed internet and modern security systems.

 

Low Income Tenants

If your property is located in a less costly area, it’s likely you will need to target lower income tenants.

Renting to tenants receiving housing benefits comes with its advantages and disadvantages;

  • One disadvantage is that rent is paid to the landlord in arrears rather than in advance.
  • There is also a lot of paperwork involved in renting to tenants on housing benefit and administration processes can be slow.
  • Another issue is contents insurance. Premiums can rise when letting to this tenant group.
  • Unfortunately, some landlords are wary of renting to tenants on housing benefit due to an assumption that their property won’t be looked after properly, and payments will be missed. However, this negative stereotype is unfounded and is down to a minority of individuals.

However, renting to this group comes will lots of benefits to landlords;

  • Due to the lack of rental properties available, advertising your property as accepting housing benefit means you will have a large pool of prospective tenants to choose from.
  • Tenants in receipt of housing benefit are often looking for long-term housing
  • As the rental payments are made by the Department for Work and Pensions, payments should be regular and guaranteed.

 

Renting to Families

Renting to families comes with wide ranging benefits;

  • For one, most families are looking for a long-term home as moving with children is a hassle usually best avoided.
  • There has also been research to show that renting to families results in less property management time.

The downside is that with children, there usually comes more damage and wear and tear to your property. If you’re particularly precious about a certain property in your portfolio, you may want to avoid renting to large families with young children.

However, if you’re letting the property long-term, you will most likely be redecorating at the end of the tenancy agreement anyway.

Most families are looking for a rental home with a little extra space. Make sure you highlight this benefit of your property when attracting tenants. Families are also more likely to have their own furniture so may be looking for an unfurnished home.

 

Tenants with Pets

It could be debated what causes more damage to a property- children or pets! While lots of landlords refuse renting to tenants with pets outright, accepting these tenants may be to your advantage.

For one thing, you can charge more in rent. With rental properties that accept pets being few and far between, pet owners will expect to pay a little extra for the privilege. The extra maintenance needed allows you to justifiably charge a premium.

If you do decide to go down this route, obtaining a previous landlord reference from your potential tenants will alert you to any problems caused in the past.

 

Renting to Student Tenants

Students have a bad reputation when it comes to taking care of rental properties. However, the student rental market is ripe with opportunity, with student homes in high demand in University towns.

Here are some of the benefits;

  • If you own property in a University town, finding tenants won’t be a problem.
  • If you’re looking for short-term lets, students tend to move on after a year.
  • Students are less fussy when it comes to appliances and furnishings, so if you have an older property with basic furnishings it shouldn’t be a problem. As long as your property complies with health and safety obligations and is a comfortable place to live, you won’t need to offer state-of-the-art appliances.
  • Renting per room means higher returns!

But don’t forget to consider the following;

  • Maintenance and repairs needed may be higher as there tends to be more individuals living in student properties.
  • Students like to socialise. When renting to students you need to be aware of the neighbours as you might be called upon to deal with complaints!
  • For most students, this is their first time living away from home. In place of a credit check, you will need to ask for a guarantor to safeguard your investment.
  • There is growing competition in the student rental market, with purpose-built housing being created. Do your research before you commit.

 

Renting to Young Professionals

Young professionals are often favoured by landlords due to their independence and financial security.

Here are some of the advantages;

  • While still young, this group are less likely to host big parties than students and tend to be more house proud, resulting in less wear and tear.
  • With more experience behind them, young professionals are better able to deal with minor issues independently before asking the landlord for help.
  • If you decide to rent an HMO property you can expect greater returns.
  • Professional couples tend to be stable tenants and are better able to manage rent requirements with two incomes.

Here’s a few things to keep in mind;

  • Like high income tenants, young professionals will expect certain living standards and mod cons. You may need to provide a dishwasher, high-speed internet and contemporary furnishings to attract this group.
  • If your property is an HMO, you need to be aware of the added paperwork and responsibilities this requires. You may also need to consider potential conflicts between tenants.
  • Young professionals tend to move jobs more often which may result in the premature end of a tenancy.
  • Younger renters usually search online to find rental properties. Bear this in mind when choosing where to advertise your property.

Finding the Right Tenant

Once you’ve chosen a target tenant group, make sure you complete this checklist before renting your property;

  • Meet your potential tenants face to face. It’s important to have a good relationship with your tenants and meeting in person is the best way to work out if it’s the right match.
  • Ensure essential tenant checks are undertaken. No Letting Go offer a right to rent check service which is a legal requirement for landlords and letting agents in the UK.
  • It’s also worth getting a credit history check and a previous landlord check to be on the safe side.

What Happens Next?

The rental property industry works both ways. If you want to attract your ideal tenant, you need to prove that you’re a responsible and organised landlord with the right safety checks in place.

No Letting Go provide a range of professional services to help streamline your workload and ensure you are fully compliant. From house viewings to inventory management, we can help during all stages of the rental process.

Browse our fully-compliant suite of letting services and feel confident that your property inventory management needs are taken care of

In a rapidly changing world, the property management industry needs to keep up. With the widespread digitisation of products and services taking over almost every sector, estate agents, property professionals and landlords alike will need to stay on the pulse.

PropTech has become one of the latest buzzwords on everyone’s lips. However, this doesn’t look like a passing fad. Not only could property tech improve the property market, but it could completely transform it for the better.

With this year’s Future PropTech event coming up, we thought it was a good time to explain what PropTech is, and why as a landlord, you should embrace it.

What is PropTech?

Firstly, let’s try to define this much-used term.

PropTech, or property technology, refers to the digital transformation of the property industry. This includes innovative technology products to improve the real estate industry as a whole. From 3d printing and machine learning to big data and virtual reality, real estate technology is ramping up a gear.

So, how could PropTech benefit you as a landlord or real estate professional?

Simplifying Tenant Checks

There’s a lot that goes on behind the scenes for property professionals when letting a property. From tenant checks to inventory management, the list goes on.

New, smart technologies could help simplify and streamline some of these processes.

Moving potential tenant checks into the online space could be key in managing workloads. PropTech innovations can help this happen, by providing easy online systems or applications. These online systems can conduct credit checks, employment history checks and process references, all at a few clicks of a mouse.

Finding the Right Tenants

Artificial Intelligence (AI) is making waves in the private rental industry and could help landlords and tenants alike find the perfect match.

By providing accurate data, smart algorithms can pair landlords with the right tenants, eliminating unsuitable partnerships and saving time.

The Badi Platform, for example, helps novice landlords rent out spare rooms safely and securely.

Smart PropTech in the Home

Smart technologies using Internet of Things (IoT) technologies are becoming increasingly popular and widespread.

Smart meters, smart security and intelligent temperature control in the home, for example are all big attractions for potential renters. To stay ahead of the competition, getting excited about these advancements could benefit you as a landlord.

We’re not saying that every tenant now expects a smart fridge that monitors its contents, but high-speed broadband could be a game changer in today’s rental market.

Handy Mobile Applications for Landlords

Mobile apps are a great way of staying on top of your portfolio. There is now a growing number of mobile apps for landlords designed to save time and make your life easier.

From tracking rent to keeping important documents safe, there’s now an app for everything! There are apps for setting key reminders such as when to update your gas safety certificate, and apps to help advertise your property to the right tenants.

For busy landlords, these organisational miracles are worth getting excited about!

Collecting Rent on Time

It’s become so prevalent now that we can barely remember our lives without it but setting up online direct debits is all thanks to these new technologies!

By setting up regular, online payments with your tenants you can feel reassured that your rent will be delivered to your bank account on time, without having to chase it up.

This process has become even quicker and easier with the development of mobile banking, meaning you can access vital information and make emergency payment transfers on the go.

These technologies are evolving all the time, so who knows how convenient rent collection could be in a few years’ time!

Streamlining Maintenance Work

For landlords with several rental properties in their portfolio, dealing with routine maintenance can feel never ending.

New PropTech technologies can take the hassle out of maintenance by providing convenient apps and systems to make requesting and performing maintenance tasks easier than ever.

For example, a tenant could report a broken boiler on an app, which could then be assessed for level of urgency, then a message could be sent to both you, the landlord, and your chosen engineer or tradesperson. Uploading photos of the repair needed also cuts out the middle step of the landlord or letting agent visiting the property to assess the issue.

360 Virtual Reality Tours

Virtual reality is becoming more prevalent everywhere we look, including within the real estate market.

Virtual tours of properties allow buyers, sellers and renters to view buildings remotely. For example, if you’re a landlord living in a different country to your rental property, a virtual tour allows you to inspect your investment without the hassle and expense of travel.

It’s also a big draw for potential tenants who are often time-poor and can help your property stand out from the crowd in an increasingly saturated market.

No Letting Go provide a nation-wide 360 virtual tour service for all types of properties with a speedy 24-hour turn around. Our tours can be embedded into any compliance report or be used in commercial sales and marketing literature. A VR tour is a great way of providing a thorough inventory for tenants or for inspecting derelict or uninhabited buildings.

Future PropTech 2019

Future PropTech 2019 is described as the world’s number one PropTech event and is a great opportunity for landlords and property professionals to discuss challenges in the industry and collaborate to find solutions.

Through a series of talks, workshops and brand showcases, this event is an easy way of keeping track of current trends and gives you the chance to network with fellow property professionals.

Stay on the Pulse with No Letting Go

Here at No Letting Go, we are dedicated to staying ahead of the latest technology in the property industry.

For our reports and inventory services, we use Kaptur, the latest in property inventory software. It’s designed by property inventory professionals to provide the most efficient way to collect, prepare, report and manage information.

If you’re a landlord or property professional looking to get ahead of the PropTech curve, we could help. We have branches across the UK providing professional, comprehensive inventory services, unbiased compliance reports and property viewings.

Browse our full range of property services here to find out how we could help.

Some believe tenants with criminal convictions are less likely to pay rent, and more likely to cause damage.

However, is it really that simple?

Should you let to tenants with a criminal record? Let’s take a closer look to help you weigh up the different factors.

 

Why Do Some Landlords Have Their Reservations?

First things first, let’s explore why some landlords have reservations about letting to certain tenants.

All private landlords are looking to safeguard their investment. This means making sure a tenant:

For this reason, many run tenant reference checks to ensure someone doesn’t have a criminal history.

However, someone with a criminal past may not necessarily be a bad tenant. This also works vice versa.

How to Find Out If a Tenant Has a Criminal Past

Asking a tenant for a basic disclosure certificate will show their criminal record. Also, certain reference checks can give you the information you’re looking for.

What to Consider When Running Criminal Record Checks

If you run a background check and discover a prospective tenant has a criminal record, there are some key factors to consider:

What Crime Was Committed?

Some crimes are far more serious than others. You should consider the severity of the offence before deciding whether to rule out a potential tenant or not.

You should also weigh up whether this crime would impact them as a tenant. If someone was caught growing cannabis in your property, for example, this is grounds to serve them with a Section 8 eviction notice.

How Many Crimes Were Committed?

Was the crime a one-off offence or multiple? This should give an indication into whether they’re a reformed character or not. An isolated incident is very different to a long rap sheet.

How Long Ago Was the Crime?

Time is also a significant factor that you should weigh up. How long ago was their crime committed?

Arrests vs. Criminal Convictions

If considering a potential tenant, you need to ensure you only look at convictions – not arrests. Being arrested for something does not make someone guilty of that crime.

Is Anyone Else at Risk?

If you’re letting a HMO, you need to make sure your other tenants won’t be at risk. This involves looking at the nature of the crime; violent offences are very different to others.

Can They Still Pay Rent?

As a landlord, your primary concern will often be to ensure your investment is secure.

Has this criminal conviction prevented them from holding down long-term employment? If so, this may impact their ability to keep up with rental payments.

This is why thorough credit checking is essential.

Is Your Rental Property at Risk?

Does the prospective tenant have a history of arson, or vandalism? This may make you think twice about whether to let to them.

Regular landlord inspections can help you ensure your property is being looked after as agreed.

 

Tips for Letting to a Tenant With a Criminal Record

If you’ve decided to proceed, here are some tips:

Landlord Insurance

Tenants with unspent criminal convictions can cause havoc for landlords, as they can make their insurance invalid.

You’re not legally required to check if your tenant has a conviction. However, many insurance providers insist you inform them if anyone with a conviction is living in the property.

Some insurance providers may refuse the tenant altogether, while others may increase your premium.

Run Thorough Checks

When it comes to a tenant with previous convictions, being thorough is key.

Don’t take any information at face value, always gather the facts for yourself. If anything seems unclear or vague, ensure you get to the bottom of it.

Meet the Tenant More Than Once

Form your own opinion of the tenant! Remember, you’re letting to a person, so building a relationship is highly important.

Meet them multiple times if possible, and decide for yourself whether you’d like to let to them.

 

To Let or Not to Let?

While many landlords have their reservations, there are some undeniable positives to letting to tenants with a criminal history:

You need to weigh up what’s right for you, considering all the factors mentioned above.

 

Need Help Safeguarding Your Property?

Regardless of who you let to, you need to ensure your property is being looked after properly.

From check in to check out, our property inventory services can help. We’ll make sure you’re compliant with safety regulations. We’ll also reduce the risk of disputes and ensure the terms of the tenancy agreement are being met! Hassle-free renting has benefits for everyone – so we’ll help you get there.